Wordy Press Releases Got You Down? Time to Go Visual.

by: Kathleen Martin

The public relations industry took a hit this past August when Google’s latest updates called for either the removal of in-line links, or tagging as ‘No Follow' for all press releases.

Bad news for those who used PR distribution solely as a tool to get links back to their respective sites for SEO. In an earlier article, I wrote about the perceived danger to PR as well as my opinion that the shift was actually an opportunity for PR professionals to get back to the heart of PR.

In short, PR isn’t dead. It’s just getting a reboot.

What that means is that coverage, whether that’s an article or other media outlet, is once again all-important. The challenge is to find a way to make your news stand out from the massive volume of other information that’s out there. Sending out press releases that get no love sucks, leaving you feeling like you’re wasting your time.

But it doesn’t have to feel that way! The fantastic thing about PR is that behind all good PR lies a good story. A story that grabs people and makes them want to learn more. The good news for you is just how many options are now available for how you tell that story.

With the volume of content that’s out there, grabbing the audience’s attention quickly is crucial. And what better way to do that than to add a visual layer to your storytelling?

PR News has done the research on visual PR and the results are pretty impressive: Press releases containing visual elements (of any kind) are 10 times (yes, you read that correctly, 10 TIMES) more likely to gain exposure and pickup than a traditional press release without images, video, or other media.

Eye opening figures, aren’t they? 

So we’re all going to be doing press releases with images, infographics, and videos attached now, right?

Reality check: Making the move to more visual PR is also a good time to ask yourself, “Is this content worth sharing?” If you can’t figure out how to make it visual, maybe not. Like Marketing, PR is effective and interesting to audiences when it helps them in some way. Are you asking yourself the important questions before you start a new press release, or are you just constantly pushing your own message for your own means?

Outlier

Video, Web, and Design Agency